a) Make sure that your house has been well heated prior to installation because the foam expands at different rates as it hits surfaces with different temperatures. If it is cold outside the sheathing may be much colder than the studs consequently the foam may expand more from the sides of the wall cavity creating air pockets in the wall cavity. This can be minimized by an experienced installer.
Heat which is created elsewhere that is transported by means of a fluid, such as water or in our case air. Spray foam insulation's most important attribute is the ability to air seal creating a custom airtight envelope within the building structure. The added benefit to air sealing is the ability to block convective heat transfer from interior to exterior during heating months and vice versa during cooling months, as the heat cannot escape through gaps in the buildings envelope without the aid of air movement from infiltration as a means of transport. https://www.youtube.com/e/ggLAUsiuI_o?app=desktop

We live in middle TN and had our house foamed last year. We noticed recently that some of the foam was shrinking and seperating from the floor joists. We contacted the installer and he informed us that the manufacturer had a problem with a batch of foam during the time frame we had our house sprayed. The contractor wasn't sure if we had the recalled batch installed in our house or not. He said he would check the batch numbers and let us know. He seems like a nice guy promising to do whatever it takes to fix any problems. Do we trust him, however, to be truthful about the batch number? Do we have any options for finding out the information ourselves? I inspected the entire crawl space of the house and noticed approximately (5) areas that were seperating and a couple areas where the foam didn't adhere to the block. Do I assume by it being so infrequent that it is nothing to be concerned about? My concern is the walls that are not capable of being visually inspected because of sheetrock.
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I've seen this only once, and it was with closed cell foam, but I've heard of it happening with open cell foam, too. I don't know the details, but I've heard it could result from a bad batch of chemicals, improper mixing, or too high a temperature. Whatever the cause, it's not a good thing. The photo below shows how the spray foam pulled away from the studs. A little bit of uninsulated area like that adds up to a lot of heat loss/gain when the whole house has that problem, as it did here.

Spray Foam Basement Walls


I did a LOT of prep before using this product. Cleaned, vacuumed, installed additional insulation etc etc etc. This spray foam was easy to work with, and did it's job as it was supposed to. If you are curious, this kit was purchased because - every "foam insulation company" I contacted either did not call back (due to no interest) OR this was too small of a job. That is why I went DIY on this one, that and: I was advised by one of these companies that they have a minimum $2k job because ... (insert your answer here, but I will choose that everyone needs to eat).
After researching this, Im curious about a method called poor mans sprayfoam where foamboard is cut to size between studs and sprayfoamed around the perimeter. Aside from the labour doing the job yourself, the cost seems comparable, is one better than the other? What about the quality of the canned sprayfoam around the perimeter? When i see sprayfoam done, it is never a full depth of the studs, so you would get 2.5-3 inches in a 3.5" (2x4) wall. Any thoughts? 

Spray Foam Roofing


Get the Power to Seal & Insulate Perfectly in Just 5 Minutes. The Foam it Green Promise: 1>Simpler, Easier, Faster Spray Foam 2>No Special Skills or Know How 3>Professional Results or Better Saves You Time, Money and Hassles. Delivers to your door, ready to use. Just follow the simple instructions. Saves Energy with High R-value Closed Cell Foam. R-Value of 7 in Just 1 Inch. Provides a seamless air barrier in 1 step. This Kit Provides Approx. 602 Square Feet at 1” thickness of cured foam. Class I E-84 Fire-Retardant Foam that meets building code specs. This Anti-Microbial Formula passed the stringent ASTM G-21 test for preventing mold growth on the surface of the foam. Includes everything you need to complete your project. Weighs 120 lbs, including steel canisters pressured with nitrogen. Orders with multiple kits on it may ship via LTL instead of UPS. The LTL carrier calls to arrange a convenient delivery time. Usually Ships Same Business Day. See Manufacturer for returns and warranty policy.

We have a 1950's ranch in Atlanta and are interviewing foam contractors to spray open cell under the roof, with an "ankle wall" out towards the eaves to seal the attic. My wife and daughters are chemically sensitive, so I'm trying to figure out how to minimize the fumes coming into the house. Additionally, at least one contractor has offered (for > $900) to remove our existing rock wool & R-13 fibreglass from the attic floor to "increase cross-ventilation into the attic". Seems to me I can't both minimize fumes AND increase cross-ventilation. They also offered to spray a fire-retardant on for >$600. Would ventilation during installation help any or woud the retardant seal off the foam and help that way? Thanks...


Spray foam insulation, when properly installed is both an air barrier and when closed cell foam is used at the proper depth a vapor barrier!  Before hiring any contractor you should establish the brand of foam being used and verify that with the named manufacture.  Please ask for ESR reports and MSDS sheets on any foam being installed in your home. A couple areas where you might consider spray foam insulation include:
Spray foam insulation is a great product. Homes insulated with it can be some of the most efficient and comfortable homes built. I've been in plenty of these homes and can tell you that when spray foam is installed properly, they outperform 99% of fiberglass batt-insulated, stick-built homes. (I can also tell you that 73% of all statistics are made up on the spot, so please don't ask for documentation of that statistic.)

SPF, a spray-applied cellular plastic, is made by mixing chemicals to create foam. Those chemicals react very quickly, expanding on contact to create foam that insulates, air seals and provides a moisture barrier. When properly installed, SPF forms a continuous barrier on walls, around corners and on contoured surfaces. It resists heat transfer very well and is an effective solution for reducing unwanted air infiltration through cracks, seams, and joints.

The product is an acrylic coating, which is packed conveniently for ease of use. As it is also in one-gallon size, you can rely on its supreme area coverage reaching up to 125 square feet. The Dicor rubber roof coating is also very easy to apply. When shopping around for a roof coating, we believe it pays off to find an easy to apply product for fast results. It is one of the best qualities of the RV roof coating that makes it a top pick in the category.

Most closed-cell spray foam is now formed using hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) blowing agents that have high global warming potential, partially or completely offsetting the climate benefits of the energy savings they can offer. In the United States, HFCs are scheduled to be phased out by January, 2021. A few spray foam suppliers have started supplying spray foam blown with hydrofluoroolefin (HFO) blowing agents without this problem as of early 2017.[14]
I've seen this only once, and it was with closed cell foam, but I've heard of it happening with open cell foam, too. I don't know the details, but I've heard it could result from a bad batch of chemicals, improper mixing, or too high a temperature. Whatever the cause, it's not a good thing. The photo below shows how the spray foam pulled away from the studs. A little bit of uninsulated area like that adds up to a lot of heat loss/gain when the whole house has that problem, as it did here.

Spray Foam Basement Walls


OK, Peter, I finally went back and read Alex Wilson's article on what he perceives as a serious problem. I haven't seen the full report, but based on the summary he wrote on the Green Building Advisor website, I question the science. It seems to me that he's chosen the wrong metric and he's basing his conclusion on too many assumptions because he doesn't have enough data. You can see my comments at the end of his article. http://m.youtube.com/embed/ggLAUsiuI_o
Steve: If your spray foam installer leaves the vents open, he will be committing the 2nd of the 4 problems I described above. You will most likely have comfort and efficiency problems. You may well have condensation problems. You will be spending a lot of money on a product that likely won't perform as it should. Don't let him leave the vents open. If the installer you've chosen doesn't understand this, you may want to choose someone else.   

Sta-Kool 780 Siliconized Acrylic White Elastomeric Roof Coating Sta-Kool 780 Siliconized Acrylic White Elastomeric Roof Coating is a high quality flexible white acrylic roof coating. Product is enhanced with silicone for improved water resistance adhesion and life expectancy. Product resists cracking peeling while offering tremendous durability and long term life. The coating forms a durable protective barrier which ...  More + Product Details Close https://www.youtube.com/attribution_link?a=ggLAUsiuI_o&u=watch?v=XXXXXX&feature=share
OK, Peter, I finally went back and read Alex Wilson's article on what he perceives as a serious problem. I haven't seen the full report, but based on the summary he wrote on the Green Building Advisor website, I question the science. It seems to me that he's chosen the wrong metric and he's basing his conclusion on too many assumptions because he doesn't have enough data. You can see my comments at the end of his article. http://m.youtube.com/embed/ggLAUsiuI_o
In the early days of insulating attics, people believed the insulation was a heat source. That’s not the case, as the insulation is actually a barrier between two areas of different temperatures. As for the “hot roof” theory, the unvented attic system could make the temperature of the roof go up a little, but this increase won’t cause damage to your shingles.
Acrylic coatings are typically applied in two coats, with the second running perpendicular to the first. 1 gallon per 100 square feet is a good estimate for these coatings, as they do not need to be applied nearly as thick as many other coatings. These coatings can be sprayed or roll-applied. Acrylic coatings generally require a re-coat within 2-3 years of application.
Thoroughly clean the roof surface. Roofs collect oils from asphalt, chimneys, and cars plus lots of dirt and dust. Coatings don’t stick well to any of these. We recommend cleaning with an inexpensive solution of TSP or TSP Substitute in a bucket of water (follow label instructions). Use a broom to scrub ponding areas and areas of peeling coatings. Work a section at a time and hose off the dirty water. Sweep away puddles to promote drying. Do not allow wash water to dry on walls, furniture, windows, and visible surfaces. 

If you're chemically sensitive, it's probably not a good idea to get it installed, but it's also not a good idea to breathe musty air from the crawl space either. In addition, your house and its contents are made of lots of materials that affect your indoor air quality. If you're really concerned about this, hire a company to test your air and tell you what you can do about it.
Repair and seal roof penetrations, tears, open seams, etc. using Elastek 103 Crack & Joint Sealant and reinforce with polyester roof fabric as necessary. In larger or deep ponding areas, apply Elastek 500 Puddle Plaster to fill in areas that hold water. Avoid using plastic roof cement. Serious ponding should be referred to a roofing contractor. Blisters in previous coatings may be opened but these areas must be allowed to dry-out completely. Blisters in the roofing ply should be left alone unless likely to break. Caulk and reinforce open seams, roof penetrations, cracks, and tears. These are potential leak points so work carefully and thoroughly. Use fabric to build flashings around roof edges or roof penetrations, and to reinforce various coating repairs. A polyester fabric is used because it will stretch with the coatings. (Fiberglas fabric is not recommended.) Fabric is normally cut to extend three inches beyond the repaired area in all directions. The coating is applied to the roof surface and the fabric is immediately pushed into the wet surface. An additional coat is applied over the fabric and the patch is allowed to dry. If your roof has stucco parapets, examine them for cracks along the sides and top. These areas often permit water to enter the wall and can cause blisters and wrinkles in the roof surface. Repair with Elastek 103 Crack & Joint Sealant. If you do not have parapets, examine the metal drip edge for a tight seal with the roof membrane. Use 4″ or 6″ roofing fabric covered under and over with Crack & Joint Sealant to seal cracks along drip edges, penetrations, and open seams. https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ggLAUsiuI_o
One of the high-tech insulation products being utilized these days is a foam-spray product called "Icynene," which is a foam that starts as two liquid components (a and b, if you will) that are heated up and sent through two hoses and meet at a tip of a gun where the magic begins. This is a thin film that expands to 100 times its volume in eight seconds, when it's permanently set up.

How Much For Spray Foam Insulation In Attic


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I did a LOT of prep before using this product. Cleaned, vacuumed, installed additional insulation etc etc etc. This spray foam was easy to work with, and did it's job as it was supposed to. If you are curious, this kit was purchased because - every "foam insulation company" I contacted either did not call back (due to no interest) OR this was too small of a job. That is why I went DIY on this one, that and: I was advised by one of these companies that they have a minimum $2k job because ... (insert your answer here, but I will choose that everyone needs to eat).
DID YOU KNOW? Spray FOam insulation out-performs conventional insulation materials because they (conventional insulation materials) trap still-dry air and if that air moves or becomes wet, the thermal resistance can drop by 50%. Spray Foam protects against air infiltration, which can increase energy costs in buildings by 10 to 40%. Eliminate these drafts and live in a more energy-efficient, comfortable and healthier building by choosing spray foam insulation.
NOVA Spray foam did just as they promised and, more importantly, for the price they quoted. The two employees who ultimately installed the product were very nice, pleasant, and respectful. Bottom line: We are delighted with the install. Our house now holds a more stable temperature and no longer has hot spots. It used to be very difficult to cool our upstairs bedrooms; those days are gone! Pocketbook issues: For the last three billing cycles we have used approximately one third less electricity as the AC does not come on as often. Would we do this again? Yup! Do we recommend this installer? Yup! Do the neighbors think it’s cool? Yup!

How Much Does Spray Foam Insulation Cost

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